• SSPF

George Renick | Inducted between 1920 and 1936

Pioneer in establishing cattle operations in America and credited with leading the first overland cattle drive to a major eastern city from the western frontier.

1776-1863 | Artist: Robert Wadsworth Grafton (1876-1936)



Impact & Accomplishments


The Renick brothers—George and Felix—were pioneers, establishing some of the first cattle operations on the western frontier. They moved from Virginia to the Scioto River valley in Ohio, in 1797 and 1798, to raise corn and feed cattle.


A dry goods business was their back-up plan, if needed. By 1802, they had acquired their first purebred Longhorn cattle. A few years later, George is credited with leading the first overland cattle drive to a major eastern city from the western frontier, through the Appalachian Mountains. The cattle drive was a success and led to regular overland drives from Ohio to Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York.


Another interesting historical note: George Renick’s Paint Hill Farm, in Ross County, is an Ohio Underground Railroad Historical site, acknowledging the family’s work to shelter runaway slaves.


Did You Know?


In 1973, the Renick House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was eligible for the Register both because of its well-preserved historic architecture and its connection to George Renick.


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