• SSPF

Andrew Boss | 1929

Boss developed the first college course in dressing and curing meats in the nation and was instrumental in increasing corn productivity through his work with Willet Hays to develop the Minnesota 13 cultivar.

1867-1947 | Artist: Robert Wadsworth Grafton (1876-1936)



Impact & Accomplishments


Considered the founder of farm management, Andrew Boss, was born in Wabash County, Minnesota, and enrolled in one of the first classes (1891) at the University of Minnesota College of Agriculture.


Upon graduation, he began his work on the research farm there, and by 1905, was elevated to full professor. As professor of animal husbandry, Boss developed the first college course in dressing and curing meats in the nation, and the university built a Meat Science Laboratory in 1901 to further the field. This building was later named for him.


Professor Boss was a major promoter of livestock shows, especially the International, and was one of the founders of his state’s livestock breeders association. Also renowned in agronomy, Boss helped increase corn productivity substantially and worked with Willet Hays to develop the Minnesota 13 cultivar.


Did You Know?


In 1901 a new meat laboratory was built, making the University of Minnesota the first university in the United States to have a meat laboratory. The current Meat Lab was named after Boss in 1977.



Geographically located between the Department of Animal Science and the Department of Food Science and Nutrition, the Meat Laboratory is a modern meat processing facility capable of processing both red meat and poultry species. In addition to the extension, research, and teaching capacities that the laboratory serves, fresh and processed meat products are also made available for purchase by the university community and interested parties, and some products may be featured in other university dining venues and events.



Andrew Boss (in the white apron) teaching in the early days of the School of Agriculture at the University of Minnesota. Photo credit: KenMcArthur.com


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